The Sinclair Method can help you stop drinking
The Sinclair Method blocks pleasure receptors in the brain
The Sinclair Method, with treatment, can reduce your interest in drinking

Our Approach

The Sinclair Method (TSM) is an outpatient treatment approach for alcohol use disorder (AUD). It uses a medication called Naltrexone to block the receptors that alcohol would otherwise bind to. When utilizing an opiate blocking medication while you continue to drink, cravings for alcohol will diminish overtime. That helps people to “retrain their brain” and naturally reduce urges to continue drinking.

Naltrexone

Naltrexone is an opiate antagonist medication that is non-addictive and does not create physical dependence. It simply binds and blocks the receptors in the brain. Once you drink alcohol or use opiates, they do not release the dopamine that creates the euphoric, feel good rush.

Because this sensation is no longer present, the desire and urge to use alcohol or opiates diminishes greatly because there is no benefit. Drinking while taking naltrexone will not make you physically sick like other medications used to treat AUD. Instead, it will cause a drinker to turn away from a drink not want anymore. Over time, the addictive behaviors cease. Managing your alcohol consumption, or not drinking at all, becomes a viable option without much struggle.

Continue Treatment

As recommended in all medication-assisted treatment programs (MAT), chemical dependency counseling and other specialized therapies are recommended to address the underlying issues associated with addiction.

Abstinence from alcohol is not expected when using this approach. In fact, one must drink to reap the benefits of this program. The goal is "pharmacological extinction.” That is having the body’s own natural reaction gradually reduce interest in alcohol and the behaviors involved with drinking.

Outcomes with The Sinclair Method

Outcomes with The Sinclair Method will vary from person to person. But with 100% compliance by the patient 78% reached “extinction” in 3-4 months. In addition, subjects were able to regain control of their drinking, whether their goal was managing consumption or complete abstinence.

We should note here that compliance with the program involves taking the medication one hour before you drink, every time you drink for the rest of your life.

Is The Sinclair Method a good approach for you?

We welcome any and all questions, comments and concerns related to TSM and your specific case. Please send us a confidential email and we will get back to you ASAP, or you can also call or text our 24/7 hotline to reach someone directly who can assist you at 937-365-HELP (4357)